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Dates of visit:
September 29, 2013 -
October 6, 2013

We rate this trip a:

Trip Highlights:
 Scenic byways
 Cripple Creek, CO
 Victor, CO
 Gold Mining
 Wolf Sanctuary
 Stations of the Cross
 Salida, CO
 Alamosa, CO
 Balloon Fiesta
 

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Second page - Victor, CO ** Hwy 67 Scenic Drive ** Colorado Wolf and Wildlife, Divide, C0
Third page - Salida, CO ** Alamosa, CO ** San Luis, CO Stations of the Cross
Fourth page - Fort Garland, CO ** Albuquerque, NM International Balloon Festival
*** Colorado ***
*** Cripple Creek, CO ***
        Travel Route
        Location of Cripple Creek
        Location of Cripple Creek with Points of Interest
        Cripple Creek
        Site Gallery - Cripple Creek
        Cripple Creek Jail Museum
        Site Gallery - Cripple Creek Jail Museum
        Mollie Kathleen Gold Mine Tour (with video)
        Site Gallery - Mollie Kathleen Gold Mine
        Cripple Creek Museum
        Site Gallery - Cripple Creek Museum
        Cripple Creek & Victor N.G.R.R. (with video)
Cripple Creek
City Map
Points of Interest ...
  • 1. Cripple Creek Heritage Center
  • 2. Mollie Kathleen Mine Tours
  • 3. Cripple Creek & Victor Narrow Gauge Train
  • 4. Gold Camp Trail
  • 5. Cripple Creek Welcome Center
  • 6. Cripple Creek District Museum
  • 7. Carr Manor Historic School Tours
  • 8. Bad Boyz Turquoise Mine
  • 9. American Legion
  • 10. Elks Lodge
  • 11. Old Homestead House Museum
  • 12. Fire Station #3
  • 13. Cripple Creek Jail Museum
  • 14. City Park/Parks & Recreation Center
  • 15. Butte Theater
  • 16. The Palladium
  • 17. Victorian Lady
  • 18. Memorial Wall
  • 19. Mt. Pisgah Cemetery

Shops/Cafes, (non-casino) ...
  • 20. District Museum Gift Shop
  • 21. Creations Everlasting Boutique and Tea Room
  • 22. Rocky Mountain Canary General Store
  • 23. Cripple Creek Coffee
  • 24. Family Dollar
  • 25. Jack Ass Cafe/Conveniences
  • 26. Just Bytes
  • 27. Sweet Baby Georges Arcade & Pizzeria
  • 28. Casino Cuts
  • 29. Jackpot Spirits
  • 30. The Creek Restaurant and Bar
  • 31. Cripple Creek Candy
  • 32. The Gold Miner's Daughter
  • 33. The Hitchin' Post
  • 34. Maudie's Incredible Emporium
  • 35. Silver Mine Gift Shop
  • 36. Nana's Nook
  • 37. Ralf's Breakroom
  • 38. Boiler Room Tavern
  • 39. Car Wash
  • 40. Cripple Creek Liquor
  • 41. Venture Foods Grocery Store/Gas Station
  • 42. Ace Hardware/Lumber
  • 43. The Crucible
  • 44. District Supply
  • 45. Community Banks of Colorado
  • 46. Midland Depot Italian Restaurant
  • 47. Gems and Things
  • 48. 9494 Gifts with Altitude
  • 49. Hard Rock Diner
  • 50. Snarealicious Bakery

Churches ...
  • 53. St. Peter's Catholic
  • 54. St. Andrew's Episcopal
  • 55. Cripple Creek Baptist

Non-Casino Lodging ...
  • 56. Carr Manor Boutique Hotel & Art Gallery
  • 57. Cherub House
  • 58. Colorado Alpen Glow B&B
  • 59. Gold King Mountain Inn (GKMI)
  • 60. Cripple Creek Motel
  • 61. Last Dollar Inn
  • 62. Hotel St. Nicholas
  • 63. Cripple Creek Hospitality House & RV Park
  • 64. Westward Ho
  • 65. Bronco Billy's Hotel
  • 66. Silver House B and B
  • 67. Eagles Landing RV Park
  • 68. Cripple Creek Inn
  • 69. Imperial Hotel
  • 70. Gold Strike Inn

Casinos/Casino Restaurants/Hotels ...
  • 71. Big Jim's Gambling, 279 E. Bennett Ave.
  • 72. Billy's Casino, 233 E. Bennett Ave.
  • 73. The Brass Ass Casino: 256 E. Bennett Ave.
  • 74. Bronco Billy's Casino: 233 E. Bennett Ave.
  • 75. Buffalo Billy's Casino: 233 E. Bennett Ave.
  • 76. Century Casino: 200-220 E. Bennett Ave.
  • 77. Colorado Grande Casino & Hotel: 300 E. Bennett Ave.
  • 78. Double Eagle Hotel & Casino: 422 E. Bennett Ave.
  • 79. Gold Creek Casino: 400 E. Bennett Avenue
  • 80. Johnny Nolon's Saloon & Gambling Emporium: 301 E. Bennett Ave.
  • 81. McGills Hotel & Casino: 256 E. Bennett Ave.
  • 82. Midnight Rose Hotel & Casino: 256 E. Bennett Ave.
  • 83. Wildwood Casino & Hotel: 119 Carbonate
Display-to-Print the Locations Directory of Cripple Creek ... Cripple Creek Points of Interest  This is a PDF document  (140 Kb)
Early Cripple Creek (Above) ... Cripple Creek at the turn of the century - 5th largest city in Colorado
Cripple Creek GOLD DISCOVERED! ... This was the world's greatest gold camp! Other districts may have produced more but none boomed the way this one did. And, none had its enduring spirit. It all began in 1890. A cowpuncher named Bob Womack made the discovery that started the last of the big gold rushes. After 15 years of prospecting on the ranch where Cripple Creek now stands, he uncovered real pay dirt in a place called Poverty Gulch.

The ore was rich. It assayed at more than $200 a ton. But on a Colorado City drinking spree, Womack sold his claim for a mere $500 and died penniless in 1909. The land where Womack's first strike was made was homesteaded by his father in 1876. By 1891, it belonged to Horace Bennett and Julias Myers, Denver real estate men.

Cripple CreekSoon after the strike, when people began swarming into the area, Bennett and Myers platted an 80-acre town site and began selling lots. The town was officially incorporated in 1892, and it was named Cripple Creek after the stream that meandered through it. The creek had been named earlier by a rancher who had seen a cow fall and cripple herself crossing it.

As other strikes were made in the area, other towns appeared. Victor, the District's second city, was established in 1893, some five miles south and east of Cripple Creek. From the beginning, Victor was called "The City of Mines," for here, on Battle Mountain, the District's largest and richest mines were located.

Cripple CreekDuring the first year following Womack's discovery, the mines of the Cripple Creek field produced about $200,000 worth of gold. The output more than doubled the next year. By 1893, the production was being measured by the millions of dollars. The camp's population swelled along with its production. Fewer than 500 people lived there at the end of 1891. Twelve months later, the population was 2,500. Then, during 1893, over 10,000 people swarmed into the District. For the next several years, the population continued to grow, at a rapid rate.

*** Continued in full articles below ***

Read the condensed History of Cripple Creek - Part 1 ... Cripple Creek History - Part 1  This is a PDF document  (2.0 Mb)
Read the condensed History of Cripple Creek - Part 2 ... Cripple Creek History - Part 2  This is a PDF document  (2.0 Mb)

Site Gallery - Town of Cripple Creek
Notable Cripple Creek Buildings
Womack City Hall Courthouse
Bob Womack Statue
City Hall
Courthouse
Police Station Fire Station Old Homestead
Police Station
Fire House
Old Homestead
Wild Horse Casino Elks Lodge Butte Theatre
Wild Horse Casino
Elks Lodge
Butte Theatre
Maudie's Emporium Bronco Billy's Hotel Big Jim's Gambling
Maudie's Emporium
Bronco Billy's Hotel
Big Jim's Gambling
Billy & Bronco Billy Casino Billy & Bronco Billy Casino Billy & Bronco Billy Casino
Billy's Casino & Bronco Billy's Casino
General Views of Cripple Creek
Cripple Creek Cripple Creek Cripple Creek
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Cripple Creek Cripple Creek Cripple Creek
Cripple Creek Cripple Creek Cripple Creek
General Views of Cripple Creek in Evening
Cripple Creek Cripple Creek Cripple Creek
Cripple Creek Cripple Creek Cripple Creek
Cripple Creek Cripple Creek Cripple Creek
Cripple Creek Cripple Creek Cripple Creek
Cripple Creek Cripple Creek Cripple Creek
The Donkeys of Cripple Creek
Cripple Creek Donkey Cripple Creek Donkey Cripple Creek Donkey
Cripple Creek Donkey Cripple Creek Donkey Cripple Creek Donkey

Cripple Creek Jail Museum

Cripple Creek JailRelive the outlaw days of the Wild West in the unique and popular Cripple Creek Jail Museum. In the late 1800s, the promise of an easy fortune lured people to the gold mines of Cripple Creek; in just ten years, the population grew from 15 to more than 50,000. Like every Western gold rush town, Cripple Creek had more than its fair share of miscreants and troublemakers. Fortunately, a brave group of men were sworn to keep the outlaws in line. Learn their stories in this authentic museum.

Cripple Creek JailHoused in a red-brick building that served as the Teller County Jail for nearly 90 years, this historic Cripple Creek museum gives visitors an taste of the shadier side of life in the World's Greatest Gold Camp, along with a glimpse into the lives of the lawmen charged with keeping the peace. As you can imagine, the jail was never short of occupants. Besides holding local burglars, robbers, highwaymen and other minor criminals, in its original incarnation this jail was also used to hold more serious offenders, including Robert Curry (aka Bob Lee), a member of the "Wild Bunch" gang who was captured after lawmen found him hiding in town.

The curators of our Cripple Creek Jail Museum have kept the original cells intact, so visitors can experience for themselves what life was like for those on the wrong side of the law. There are also displays highlighting the laws and the lawless, with samples of police logs from the 1890s, copies of early city ordinances and newspaper accounts of crimes both big and small.

Text Source: http://visitcripplecreek.com/businesses/cripple-creek-jail-museum

Site Gallery - Cripple Creek Jail Museum
Jail Museum Jail Museum Jail Museum
Jail Museum Jail Museum Jail Museum
Jail Museum Jail Museum Jail Museum
Jail Museum Jail Museum Jail Museum
Mollie Kathleen Gold Mine History

Mollie KathleenThe Story of Mollie & Her Famous Gold Mine ... As handed down by descendants of Mary Catherine Gortner & The National Geological Survey.

Coming West to Colorado from Ottumwa, Iowa, arriving with her husband Henry, son Perry and daughter Elizabeth, the Gortner family first settled on North Nevada Street in Colorado. Springs. In the spring of 1891 Mollie's son Perry arrived in the Cripple Creek area employed as a surveyor assigned to map mining claims of this country's newest and overlooked frontier. With all news of the day focused on Cripple Creek's gold.

Mollie loaded the family wagon with supplies and joined the next wagon train heading west up Ute Pass to visit her son. After a four day trip, Mollie was relieved to find Perry had completed construction of a half log half canvas field tent. Mollie wasted little time setting up housekeeping.

Gold MineIn September of that year (1891), Perry while surveying upper Poverty Gulch, saw a huge herd of elk. Later he told Mollie of the herd so she headed out to see for herself. As she made her way up Poverty Gulch (three hundred yards past Cripple Creek's first gold strike - Bob Womack's Gold King Mine), winded Mollie decided to rest.






Gold MineLooking downward, as she caught her breath, Mollie noticed an interesting rock formation that winked back at her. Using a rock to break off a sample, she could hardly believe her eyes, the outcropping was pure gold laced in quartz. With her heart racing Mollie nonchalantly hid gold samples amongst her clothing, she had to be calm, and there were a number of prospectors in the area. Earlier that day Mollie had mingled with Bob Womack whom had overlooked her find for more than a dozen years prospecting an area he had nicknamed Poverty Gulch.

Gold MineBy her determined act, Mollie Kathleen Gortner became the first woman in the Gold Camp to discover gold and strike a claim in her own name. This was clearly a bold move out of step with the times. Most men of the time, only named their horses, jack asses, and mines after their women, it was very uncommon to let a woman claim something of such value.

Even after her mine was in production and when visited by the National Geological Survey, it's authors entered their report of the mine being "Discovered by Mr. M.C. Gortner" Mr. Gortner's name was Henry - - - Mollie's name was Mary Catherine Gortner. Mollie Kathleen Gortner Died in 1917. Henry would later die of a broken heart one short year later. Perry Gortner was left 1/3 interest in his mother's gold discovery and was managing operator of the Mollie Kathleen until his death in 1949. The Gortner family lay to rest in Evergreen Cemetery Colorado Springs, CO.


Video recorded: October 2013
HINT
: If video starts/stops often, PAUSE the playback for 15-30 seconds to allow the video buffer memory to fill. To resume playback press PLAY.
Site Gallery - Mollie Kathleen Gold Mine
Gold Mine Gold Mine Gold Mine
Gold Mine Gold Mine Gold Mine
Gold Mine Gold Mine Gold Mine
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Gold Mine Gold Mine Gold Mine
Gold Mine Gold Mine Gold Mine
Cripple Creek Museum

Cripple Creek MuseumThe Cripple Creek District Museum is a museum located in Cripple Creek, Colorado. Founded in 1953 by Blevins Davis and Richard Wayne Johnson, the Museum has five historic buildings: The 1894 Colorado Trading & Transfer Company building, the 1895 Midland Terminal Depot that was used as a depot until 1949; a turn-of-the-century Assay Office, the former one-room home of French Blanche LeCroix from the Cripple Creek District town of Midway, and a miner's cabin circa 1890-1930.

Cripple Creek MuseumToday the Museum has four living areas illustrating life in the Victorian Era, an Art Gallery, a 15-minute video on the Assay Process, and numerous displays exhibiting photographs, maps, newspapers, books, wagons, minerals, mining equipment, the history of businesses, lodges, churches and schools, thousands of furnishings and personal items belonging to former pioneers to the District, information on towns and camps within the District and Teller County, and a Museum Gift Shop.

Text Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cripple_Creek_District_Museum
Site Gallery - Cripple Creek District Museum
District Museum District Museum District Museum
District Museum District Museum District Museum
District Museum District Museum District Museum
District Museum District Museum District Museum
District Museum District Museum District Museum
District Museum District Museum District Museum
District Museum District Museum District Museum
Cripple Creek and Victor Narrow Gauge Railroad

Cripple Creek TrainOn June 28th, 1967, Dr. John M. Birmingham opened the Cripple Creek and Victor Narrow Gauge Railroad for business. The CC&V RR has been carrying passengers ever since. The Railroad has always been a family business, now operated and managed by Jim and his family. John still plays an active role in overseeing the operations of the Railroad. John Birmingham was born into a railroad family, his father was an engineer for the Union Pacific Railroad and also his grandfather. In 1965 he purchased two locomotives from the Climax Molybdenum mine of Colorado. They were located in Mexico, one was fully operational the second was 60% through a major overhaul. John spent a lot of spare time and vacations to build the railroad, he had help from his friends and family.

Cripple Creek TrainThe gift shop and ticket office now next to the original Cripple Creek Midland Depot was rescued from the old Midland Terminal line, Originally built in 1894 as the Anaconda station, was moved to Bull Hill after the fire of 1904 destroyed most of Anaconda. It was moved to its present location in 1968. It was impossible to still find a water tower so John had one made of wood by Denver Tank and Reel and moved to its present location.


Today we use three of the narrow gauge locomotives during the summer season. All are coal-fired two foot Narrow Gauge Locomotives. The Number 1 is a Orenstein and Koppel built in 1902 0-4-4-0 articulated mallet. The Number 2 engine is a Henschel built in 1936 0-4-0, built in Germany. The Number 3 is a Porter built in 1927 0-4-0 tank engine. The Number 4 engine is the Bagnall built in 1947 0-4-4-0T, this engine is currently being restored. Besides the four passenger engines the Railroad owns another locomotive. One is a 1951 General Electric, four wheel, Diesel-Electric engine, originally battery operated for underground work at the Idarado Mine near Telluride. The engine is currently being used by the track crew


Video recorded: October 2013
HINT
: If video starts/stops often, PAUSE the playback for 15-30 seconds to allow the video buffer memory to fill. To resume playback press PLAY.

Text Source: http://cripplecreekrailroad.com/history/

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